Saturday, Jan 20th, 2018

Dealing with dams

Posted on January 11, 2018 Richard MacKenzie; [email protected]


Water rose to concerning levels, near the James Street overpass, in mid-December. Beaver dams built in a culvert in the area contributed to the problem which the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal addressed. Submitted

Work was required in mid-December to remove a beaver dam which was causing significant water collection near the Hwy. 104 overpass in James River.
Local resident Sandy MacDonald said he became aware of multiple dams in the area, in the summer, and started, at that point, notifying the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal (TIR) of their potential risks.
“And the one that caused the problem this time was right beside the highway,” MacDonald said. “It came to be a safety issue because it was six to eight feet of water starting to build up right beside the highway.”
MacDonald added he felt a more proactive approach could have been taken to address the situation.
TIR spokesperson Marla MacInnis responded to Casket inquiries about the concern and work eventually done.
“If there is a situation where infrastructure is at risk due to beaver activity, we work with the Department of Natural Resources to lower the waterway and remove the beavers, if necessary,” MacInnis said.
“If a resident sustains damage to his or her property, or feels provincial infrastructure is at risk, they can contact the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.
“We have been monitoring the water levels at James River since the summer. Once the water levels became a potential risk to the road, we worked with the Department of Natural Resources to lower the water, remove the blockage and hired a local trapper to remove the beavers.”

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