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Antigonish International Film Festival to screen 33 of the best

Antigonish International Film Festival (AIFF) organizing committee members Shaun Chisholm (left), Elaine MacLean, Leo MacLean, Trina Davenport, Don Davenport and Carole Roy with this year’s promotional banner.
Antigonish International Film Festival (AIFF) organizing committee members Shaun Chisholm (left), Elaine MacLean, Leo MacLean, Trina Davenport, Don Davenport and Carole Roy with this year’s promotional banner. - Sam Macdonald

Popular fall festival now a dozen years old

ANTIGONISH, N.S. - Twelve years of screening the finest documentaries in the world; that’s the crowning achievement of the Antigonish International Film Festival (AIFF).

To choose 33 of “the best of the best,” the AIFF selection committee previewed numerous films by outstanding global filmmakers and selected 33 to screen at this year’s film festival Oct. 26 and 27.

Ranking the individual films is a challenging job that goes on for 12 months, with the aim of discovering the most interesting, inspiring and, sometimes, disturbing films for the documentary-hungry Antigonish audience.

From that top 33, here is a random sample that will be offered to this year's discerning viewers:

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail; about a small New York community bank that was prosecuted when every other bank was deemed too big to be charged.

The Coming War on China. Award-winning journalist John Pilger tells you why the world’s two greatest military powers are on their way to a frightening encounter that could end in war between these nuclear powers.

Alive and Kicking: The Soccer Grannies of South Africa. This one is filled with sport, laughter and song, as a group of South African ladies fight for a decent life for themselves, their team, and their community. It is an inspiring film for any age.

Leonard Cohen: Bird On a Wire. This film was made in the 1970s then disappeared, to be found again many years later. Hear Leonard Cohen at his best more than 40 years ago and see powerful footage of the American war in Vietnam as it was being fought.

The Nuns, the Priests, and the Bombs, astutely directed by filmmaker Helen Young. When the protesters break into ‘top secret’ nuclear facilities, are they criminals to be locked up or are they a wakeup call to all of us?

Organizers encourage folks to see as many films as they can during the two-day event.

Festival passes covering the two day festival are only $20 each or just $5 each for students or the unwaged. Buy them at the People’s Place Library and look for details of venues and film times at antigonishfilmfest.org.

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