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Students make and donate washer toss game to manor

Grade 11 options and opportunities program students at East Antigonish Education Centre/Academy Alex Boyle (left), Dallas Gavin and Colin Sampson, along with teacher Greg MacDonald, are pictured with residents of Greenwold Manor after delivering a washer toss game they made and donated to the manor, along with four of their fellow students.
Grade 11 options and opportunities program students at East Antigonish Education Centre/Academy Alex Boyle (left), Dallas Gavin and Colin Sampson, along with teacher Greg MacDonald, are pictured with residents of Greenwold Manor after delivering a washer toss game they made and donated to the manor, along with four of their fellow students. - Richard MacKenzie

Service learning project to benefit seniors

ANTIGONISH, N.S. - While it may only be mid-November, the residents of Greenwold Manor in Antigonish were given a reason to look forward to the spring Nov. 14, courtesy of Grade 11 options and opportunities program students at East Antigonish Education Centre/Academy.

Students Colin Sampson, Alex Boyle and Dallas Gavin, along with teacher Greg MacDonald, delivered washer-toss boxes to the manor on behalf of fellow students in the program; McKayla Tate, Colby Pettipas, Skyler Benoit and Jamie DeCoste.

The connection between residents of the manor and the program at the school in Monastery was made through Antigonish Town and County Crime Prevention Association’s senior safety co-ordinator Anita Stewart. Stewart said after a request for help to acquire a washer toss game for the residence, and a search for a game not being used came up empty, she recalled the wonderful wood projects her own children created and took home from East Antigonish Education Centre/Academy.

“I contacted Greg and asked if he and his students would consider making the washer toss game as a school project and then donating it to the residents of Greenwold Manor,” Stewart said. “Greg was gracious enough to agree to have several of his students make the washer toss game. Something that seems so simple as a washer toss game will allow residents to get out and enjoy an activity, help foster new friendships and, hopefully, residents who have never played the game before will try it and find a new hobby.”

Stewart noted the importance of “staying active and socializing.”

“I hope to be invited back for a game in the spring; a little friendly competition and a few laughs would be great,” she said.

Dallas talked about how long the service learning project took for the students.

“Honestly, if we had a full day, we probably could have done them in that day,” he said. “But where we had just an hour each day, it took us about two weeks to make them; just getting the materials ready and putting everything together.”

Alex said he can understand the desire by the residents.

“My family is pretty big into washer toss; we have washer toss tournaments at our reunions,” he said, adding part of his role was painting the washers which took some time to dry.

“All part of the process,” he said.

Colin said it was nice to be part of the delivery and see the smiles on the faces of the residents as they dropped off the game.

“Service learning is about getting out in the community and helping people,” Dallas said, as all three students agreed it was great to be able to do that was practicing their carpentry skills.

      

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