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Young volunteer knows importance of MADD Red Ribbon campaign

The Antigonish MADD chapter launched its annual Red Ribbon campaign Nov. 9, with a checkpoint on St. Andrew Street. Volunteers Susan MacAskill, left, MADD Atlantic Canada regional manager; Travis DeYoung, Kaleigh MacLean, Const. Chrissy Pelly, Daniel MacLean, Graham MacLean, Tony Cotie, Elizabeth MacLean, and Const. Tom Kelloway participated in the event. COREY LEBLANC/THE CASKET
The Antigonish MADD chapter launched its annual Red Ribbon campaign Nov. 9, with a checkpoint on St. Andrew Street. Volunteers Susan MacAskill, left, MADD Atlantic Canada regional manager; Travis DeYoung, Kaleigh MacLean, Const. Chrissy Pelly, Daniel MacLean, Graham MacLean, Tony Cotie, Elizabeth MacLean, and Const. Tom Kelloway participated in the event. COREY LEBLANC/THE CASKET - Corey LeBlanc
ANTIGONISH, N.S. —

ANTIGONISH, N.S. — Daniel MacLean is one of the millions of innocent victims of impaired driving.
The young volunteer with the Antigonish MADD chapter was only 14 months old when his father, Patrick MacEachern, was killed in a tragic crash in 2008. 
The 20-year-old MacEachern was a passenger in a vehicle operated by an impaired driver.
“It can happen to anybody,” said Elizabeth MacLean, Daniel’s maternal grandmother and Antigonish MADD chapter board member.
Her family knows all too well the “tragic consequences” that can occur when someone decides to get behind the wheel after drinking.
More than a decade ago, that day left MacLean’s daughter, Shayna, without her partner and the father of their two sons, Daniel and Derek, who was four at that time.
“We have never been the same,” MacLean said.
The grandmother and grandson were among a group of volunteers that helped launch Project Red Ribbon in Antigonish, Nov. 9, with an information and checkpoint on St. Andrew Street.
Along with community volunteers, representatives of Emergency Health Services, C.L. Curry Funeral Home, Antigonish RCMP and Town of Antigonish Volunteer Fire Department also turned out to deliver the important message to always drive sober.
They have seen the consequences of impaired driving up close and would love not to repeat those experiences.
With the iconic red ribbon, which is most often tied around the antennas of vehicles, MADD Canada chapters deliver the sober driving message ensuring it stays top of mind during the holiday season.
Up until Jan. 6, 2020, as the MADD Canada website points out, chapters like Antigonish and community leaders across the country will distribute more than one million ribbons and red ribbon car decals to wear and display.
“If we can stop just one person (from driving impaired), it would all be worth it,” MacLean said, stressing the importance of the Project Red Ribbon campaign.

The MADD red ribbon
The iconic red ribbons are available through the MADD Canada web site, individual chapters, community leaders and participating sponsor outlets.
The ribbons are meant to remind everyone to:
- Never drive impaired or ride with an impaired driver,
- Plan ahead, if you’re going to be drinking or consuming cannabis or other drugs,
- Call an Uber or a cab, arrange a designated driver, take public transit or stay the night if you might be impaired,
- Call 911, if you see a driver you suspect is impaired. 
For information on the signs of an impaired driver and what to do, visit MADD Canada’s Campaign 911 page www.madd.ca

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